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Rep. Jane Jones Research


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Vulnerability Memo

This memo is our opinion of the facts regarding Ms. Jones and their gravity. While the information in the following sections should be given the same weight as the source material on which is it based, this memo represents our opinion.

Ms. Jones styles herself a modern liberal and as such she is vulnerable to common criticisms leveled at liberal candidates. Our research suggests she is also vulnerable to attacks that are unrelated to her political ideology.

Tax Happy Liberal

Jones is a proponent of higher taxes and fees and opposed to austerity measures necessary to balance the state budget in recent years. She proposed a new internet sales tax and in 2005 she proposed HOV lane tolls on single drivers to slow growth on the West Side. In opposing two of the three state budgets for which she sat, she opposed a raft of spending cuts including reductions in the cost of operating the legislative body itself and painful cuts to higher education. The budget she supported contained a reinstatement of the food tax and a sales tax increase. As a city councilor, Jones supported a hotel tax and a quarter-cent tax increase to provide $26 million for public safety improvements.

Jones supports indulgent spending on legislators’ compensation and herself received several COLA raises. In 2009, for example, she supported a bill that sought to raise legislators’ pension benefit from $19,000 to $28,000 annually at a time when the state was asking public employees to accept pay freezes and pension contribution hikes. This position the dual advantages of playing well with a broad audience and being particularly salient with rank-and-file public employees whose local union may have endorsed Jones in previous elections. As a city councilor and as an Assistant Cabinet Secretary, Jones received small COLA pay increases. The later of these was $4,000 per year or five percent.

Alcohol Problems?

In her personal life, Jones revealed a 1998 DWI in Texas and numerous traffic infractions in State, such that she was ordered to attend classes, which she missed. In addition, Jones could be accused of double dipping as her salary from State Voices for Children, bolstered by a generous three months severance, is largely supported by public funds.

Liberal Extremist

Jones is vocally supported by environmental groups and by labor unions. Her outstanding record on environmental issues earned her a 100% lifetime score from Conservation Voters of State. In the current election Jones been endorsed by the Teamsters and the Sierra Club and in previous elections she been endorsed by the AFL-CIO and AFSCME.

In her personal life, Jones revealed a 1998 DWI in Texas and numerous traffic infractions in State, so many that she was ordered to attend classes, which she missed. In addition, Jones could be accused of double dipping as her salary from State Voices for Children, bolstered by a generous three months severance, is largely supported by public funds.

Jones is vocally supported by environmental groups and by labor unions. Her outstanding record on environmental issues earned her a 100% lifetime score from Conservation Voters of State. In the current election Jones been endorsed by the Teamsters and the Sierra Club and in previous elections she been endorsed by the AFL-CIO and AFSCME.

[Wasilla News, 11/6/2008; Wasilla News, 11/6/2008]

Spending Lavishly on Taxpayer Dime

Jones used more than $23,000 in taxpayer funds to refurbish her state office. What’s more, she used another $19,000 to renovate her district office a year later. Itemized receipts suggest Jones and her staff purchased a gold toilet, a $5,000 bust of President George Washington, three $6,000 desks and a $5,000 chair.

Executive Summary

Highlights

Obamacare & Health Care

  • A June 2010 Wasilla Free Press/WXYZ-TV poll showed Jones leading Pleasantville Mayor Tommy Carcetti 29 percent to 23 percent with 48 percent of respondents undecided. Despite Jones’s lead among Democrats, however, the poll showed GOP frontrunner and Juno businessman Don Johnson leading Jones by 19 percent and Tommy Carcetti by 23 percent.

  • In November 2008, Jones won re-election with 66 percent of the vote, fending off Republican challenger, Demi Eggers, who received 34 percent of the vote. Jones also fought off a recall effort led by the group Taxpayers to Recall Jones, which was founded by local opponents after Jones supported tax increases to close a $1.8 billion deficit in the state budget.

  • In November 2006, Democrats took control of the Alaska House of Representatives for the first time since 1998 and selected Jones to be their Speaker. Jones said her top priorities would be dealing with the state’s budget problems and replacing the revenue from the state’s Single Business Tax. She also said health care was among her top priorities.

  • Jones consistently won endorsements from the Wasilla Free Press and the Wasilla News over the course of her political career. Jones also received the endorsement of the Wasilla Regional Chamber PAC in 2006.

Budgets & Taxes Highlights

  • A June 2010 Wasilla Free Press/WXYZ-TV poll showed Jones leading Pleasantville Mayor Tommy Carcetti 29 percent to 23 percent with 48 percent of respondents undecided. Despite Jones’s lead among Democrats, however, the poll showed GOP frontrunner and Juno businessman Don Johnson leading Jones by 19 percent and Tommy Carcetti by 23 percent.

  • In November 2008, Jones won re-election with 66 percent of the vote, fending off Republican challenger, Demi Eggers, who received 34 percent of the vote. Jones also fought off a recall effort led by the group Taxpayers to Recall Jones, which was founded by local opponents after Jones supported tax increases to close a $1.8 billion deficit in the state budget.

  • In November 2006, Democrats took control of the Alaska House of Representatives for the first time since 1998 and selected Jones to be their Speaker. Jones said her top priorities would be dealing with the state’s budget problems and replacing the revenue from the state’s Single Business Tax. She also said health care was among her top priorities.

  • Jones consistently won endorsements from the Wasilla Free Press and the Wasilla News over the course of her political career. Jones also received the endorsement of the Wasilla Regional Chamber PAC in 2006.

Political History

  • A June 2010 Wasilla Free Press/WXYZ-TV poll showed Jones leading Pleasantville Mayor Tommy Carcetti 29 percent to 23 percent with 48 percent of respondents undecided. Despite Jones’s lead among Democrats, however, the poll showed GOP frontrunner and Juno businessman Don Johnson leading Jones by 19 percent and Tommy Carcetti by 23 percent.
  • In November 2008, Jones won re-election with 66 percent of the vote, fending off Republican challenger, Demi Eggers, who received 34 percent of the vote. Jones also fought off a recall effort led by the group Taxpayers to Recall Jones, which was founded by local opponents after Jones supported tax increases to close a $1.8 billion deficit in the state budget.
  • In November 2006, Democrats took control of the Alaska House of Representatives for the first time since 1998 and selected Jones to be their Speaker. Jones said her top priorities would be dealing with the state’s budget problems and replacing the revenue from the state’s Single Business Tax. She also said health care was among her top priorities.
  • Jones consistently won endorsements from the Wasilla Free Press and the Wasilla News over the course of her political career. Jones also received the endorsement of the Wasilla Regional Chamber PAC in 2006.

Pay & Perks Highlights

  • A June 2010 Wasilla Free Press/WXYZ-TV poll showed Jones leading Pleasantville Mayor Tommy Carcetti 29 percent to 23 percent with 48 percent of respondents undecided. Despite Jones’s lead among Democrats, however, the poll showed GOP frontrunner and Juno businessman Don Johnson leading Jones by 19 percent and Tommy Carcetti by 23 percent.

  • In November 2008, Jones won re-election with 66 percent of the vote, fending off Republican challenger, Demi Eggers, who received 34 percent of the vote. Jones also fought off a recall effort led by the group Taxpayers to Recall Jones, which was founded by local opponents after Jones supported tax increases to close a $1.8 billion deficit in the state budget.

  • In November 2006, Democrats took control of the Alaska House of Representatives for the first time since 1998 and selected Jones to be their Speaker. Jones said her top priorities would be dealing with the state’s budget problems and replacing the revenue from the state’s Single Business Tax. She also said health care was among her top priorities.

  • Jones consistently won endorsements from the Wasilla Free Press and the Wasilla News over the course of her political career. Jones also received the endorsement of the Wasilla Regional Chamber PAC in 2006.

Political History

Highlights


  • A June 2010 Wasilla Free Press/WXYZ-TV poll showed Jones leading Pleasantville Mayor Tommy Carcetti 29 percent to 23 percent with 48 percent of respondents undecided. Despite Jones’s lead among Democrats, however, the poll showed GOP frontrunner and Juno businessman Don Johnson leading Jones by 19 percent and Tommy Carcetti by 23 percent.

  • In November 2008, Jones won re-election with 66 percent of the vote, fending off Republican challenger, Demi Eggers, who received 34 percent of the vote. Jones also fought off a recall effort led by the group Taxpayers to Recall Jones, which was founded by local opponents after Jones supported tax increases to close a $1.8 billion deficit in the state budget.

  • In November 2006, Democrats took control of the Alaska House of Representatives for the first time since 1998 and selected Jones to be their Speaker. Jones said her top priorities would be dealing with the state’s budget problems and replacing the revenue from the state’s Single Business Tax. She also said health care was among her top priorities.

  • Jones consistently won endorsements from the Wasilla Free Press and the Wasilla News over the course of her political career. Jones also received the endorsement of the Wasilla Regional Chamber PAC in 2006.


2010 Democratic Bid for Governor

June 2010 Poll Shows Jones Maintaining Lead Among Democratic Candidates In June 2010, a Wasilla Free Press/WXYZ-TV poll showed Jones maintaining her lead among the Democratic candidates for Governor of Alaska. The poll showed Jones leading Pleasantville Mayor Tommy Carcetti 29 percent to 23 percent with 48 percent of respondents undecided. Despite Jones’s lead among Democrats, however, the poll showed GOP frontrunner and Juno businessman Don Johnson leading Jones by 19 percent and Tommy Carcetti by 23 percent. [Wasilla Free Press, 6/3/2010]

Jones Formally Entered Race in February 2010; Said She Could Lead Economic Recovery Jones formally entered the race for governor in late February 2010, calling herself a reform-minded Democrat with appeal to both conservatives and unions. She announced her bid on Feb. 28, 2010, at the Wasilla Diesel engine plant in Pleasantville, Alaska, her hometown:

I think I’m best suited to lead our state through these difficult economic times and lead us to a better day when we can see economic growth and job growth happen again. My frustration in Pleasantville been watching the interference of government at times and stifling growth. We’ve got to basically reinvent government from top to bottom and make it work for the people and work for less dollars. [Wasilla Free Press, 2/28/2010]

Jones Announced Formation of Campaign Committee in January 2010. In January 2010, Jones announced via a Web site video that she was forming a campaign committee to run for governor. In her announcement, Jones said she would promote innovation to create new jobs and called for an end to bitter partisanship. She said: “I have sought new answers to tough problems and looked for innovative solutions to get us past the tired fights that block our progress. I haven’t always succeeded, but I’ve never quit trying.” [Wasilla Free Press, 6/10/2010]

[Wasilla News, 11/6/2008; Wasilla News, 11/6/2008]

2008 District 17 Election & Recall

Jones Won Re-Election with 66 Percent of the Vote & Fought Off Recall In November 2008. Jones won re-election with 66 percent of the vote, fending off Republican challenger, Demi Eggers, who received 34 percent of the vote. Jones also fought off a recall effort led by the group Taxpayers to Recall Jones, which was founded by local opponents after Jones supported tax increases to close a $1.8 billion deficit in the state budget. [Wasilla News, 11/6/2008; Wasilla News, 11/6/2008]

State Ruled that Jones Recall Effort Could Go on November 2008 Ballot In September 2008, Alaska Secretary of State Terry Bradshaw ruled that the effort to recall Jones could go on the November ballot following a court-ordered recount of the signatures obtained to get the initiative on the ballot. In a letter sent to Jones, Land said her decision “was rendered after a re-examination of 2,053 signatures obtained by circulators who were not registered to vote and/or did not reside in the 17th State House District at the time the signatures were collected.”

Former Republican state Rep. Leon Lett, who orchestrated the Jones recall effort as head of the Alaska Taxpayers Alliance, said Jones would be forced to contemplate whether “raising taxes on her constituents and raising the state budget to its highest level ever, while their incomes and property values are declining, was a good idea.” Jones responded to the ruling by saying: I’m confident if you looked at the quality of the signatures, the recall election would not go forward. [Wasilla News, 9/6/2008]

Jones Recall Effort Revived with Court Ruling In August 2008, U.S. District Judge Robert Holmes Bell ruled that the Alaska law requiring recall petition circulators to be registered voters and to live in the same district as the public official in question was unconstitutional. She ordered Secretary of State Terry Bradshaw to review 2,053 signatures on the petition that were initially ruled invalid and said that if a sufficient number of these were deemed valid under the new ruling, the recall could go on the November 4 ballot. Former GOP state Rep. Leon Lett, who coordinated the recall campaign against Jones, called Bell’s ruling a “major win” that vindicated the rights of citizens. [Wasilla Free Press, 8/28/2008]

Jones Beat 2 Opponents to Win Democratic Primary with Nearly Two-Thirds of the Vote. In August 2008, Jones beat two opponents to win the Democratic primary for the District 17 seat in the Alaska House of Representatives with nearly two-thirds of the vote. Jones said: It shows people will trust the person more than the rhetoric. If you work hard for the district, they will trust you to do the right thing. [Station Rapids Press, 8/6/2008]

State Election Officials: Recall Petition Lacks Enough Valid Signatures to Go Forward. In June 2008, state election officials ruled that only about 8,000 of the 15,000 signatures submitted for the petition to recall Jones were valid. As a result, the drive to recall Jones fell short by 776 signatures; the officials noted that the only way to overturn their decision would be in court.

Former GOP state Rep. Leon Lett, who led the recall campaign, vowed to get a court order to reverse the decision by Secretary of State Terry Bradshaw. Alaska Democratic Party Chairman Jesse Brewer, on the other hand, said the officials’ decision “placed the final nail in the coffin of what been an illegal, deceptive and fraudulent campaign. [Wasilla Free Press, 6/6/2008]

[Wasilla News, 11/6/2008; Wasilla News, 11/6/2008]

Democratic Party: Organizers Collected Signatures of Dead People; Recall Organizer Alleged Sabotage. In June 2008, the Alaska Democratic Party called for a criminal investigation into the group trying to recall Jones, claiming that the group had collected hundreds of forged signatures, including those of dead people. Alaska Democratic Party Chairman Jesse Brewer filed a complaint with Alaska Secretary of State Terry Bradshaw detailing 499 forgeries on the recall petition. The complaint alleged that some of the forged signatures were collected at Wasilla homeless shelters using names chosen from phone books. Recall organizer Leon Lett, a former GOP state Representative, responded by alleging that recall opponents had committed fraud by illegally collecting or signing petitions in an attempt to sabotage the recall effort. [Wasilla Free Press, 6/3/2008]

Secretary of State: Petition to Recall Jones is Short of Signatures. In May 2008, Alaska Secretary of State Terry Bradshaw ruled that a petition drive to recall Jones had failed to obtain enough signatures to be put on the ballot in August. Her office disqualified 7,515 signatures as invalid, enough to make the petition fall 500 signatures short of the required number needed to win placement on the ballot. The signatures were ruled invalid because the signers or petition circulators did not meet state voter-registration rules. [Wasilla Free Press, 5/24/2008]

Wasilla Free Press Applauded Secretary of State’s Decision to Prohibit Recall Following the Secretary of State’s ruling to prohibit the recall effort from being placed on the August 2008 ballot, the Wasilla Free Press wrote in an editorial that it supported the decision:

So it’s good news that the Secretary of State dealt a crippling, and maybe lethal, blow to the efforts to recall Alaska House Speaker Jones, D-Pleasantville, over her efforts to raise taxes last year.

Whether you believe the tax increase unwelcome but necessary (as the Free Press does) or totally irresponsible, a recall was far from the proper response. Jones and others who supported new taxes weren’t derelict in their duties, weren’t dishonest with voters, didn’t break any laws or canons of office.

They made a policy choice, a tough one under absurdly restrictive circumstances, faced as they were with one of the largest deficits in Alaska history. Those who disagree with that choice have an opportunity to vote against Jones and her colleagues this November, when they stand for re-election. [Wasilla Free Press, 5/28/2008]

Recall Organizers Submitted Signatures; Democrats Claimed Fraud in Collection In May 2008, the Alaska Taxpayers Alliance submitted signatures it had collected for a petition to recall Jones. The group submitted 16,000 signatures, with at least 11,300 passing a spot check easily enough to satisfy the requirement of 8,724 valid signatures for placement on the ballot.

The Alaska Democratic Party claimed, however, that recall supporters had used deceptive and illegal means to collect the signatures; state Democratic Party Chairman Jesse Brewer said: This recall drive had no support in the district and had to rely on illegal tactics and almost complete out-of-district funding. We will expose their fraudulent, illegal conduct. Jones also challenged the validity of the signatures, saying the group had violated numerous state laws in its campaign: It’s a sad day in the state of Alaska. It’s just not a productive way for us to spend our time. [Wasilla News, 5/2/2008]

Wasilla News: Recall Efforts are Pointless In April 2008, the Wasilla News wrote in an editorial that the recall efforts being led by the Alaska Taxpayers Alliance were pointless:

But the vicious campaign to recall Jones is unwarranted. Similarly, a payback drive to recall former House Speaker Craig DeRoche, R-Novi, who also played a pivotal role in the budget scramble, is equally pointless.

First, the voters in Jones’s and DeRoche’s districts have an opportunity to express either their displeasure or support of the lawmakers in the upcoming August primary and November general elections. Even if the recall supporters are successful in gathering enough petition signatures to force special elections, they are unlikely to occur much before those already scheduled… Forging ahead with the recalls is vindictive. Anything that can be accomplished with a recall vote can be achieved through the normal balloting process and for a lot less money. [Wasilla News, 4/28/2008]

Democratic Party Hired Convicted Felon to Dissuade Voters From Signing Recall Petition In April 2008, the Alaska Taxpayers Alliance attacked the Alaska Democratic Party for hiring a convicted felon to go door-to-door educating voters about Jones’s voting record and dissuading them from signing the recall petition. The Democratic party had hired Marco Mitchell, who had been convicted of eight offenses including armed robbery and gun charges since 1990. Party spokeswoman Liz Kerr said there was nothing illegal about hiring Mitchell, who was legally out of prison and on parole. Former GOP state Rep. Leon Lett, who led the recall effort, said: It’s a perfect hire. They are pulling out all the stops, hiring a violent felon with a rap sheet and throwing her in the field for stalking and intimidation efforts. [Wasilla News, 4/25/2008]

Taxpayers to Recall Andy Jones: Jones’s Staff Stalking & Harassing Petition Circulators In March 2008, Taxpayers to Recall Jones alleged that Jones’s staff was stalking and harassing petition circulators. The allegations emerged after the group identified two petition blockers as paid staff members of the Pleasantville Township Democrat. According to the group, the two people they identified were among 10 who had intimidated petition circulators at sites throughout Jones’s district.

Petition organizer and former GOP state Rep. Leon Lett said: [The volunteers] try and overcome the gang noise, but it’s too much; petitioners would leave. That’s exactly what Jones’s thugs wanted to have happen.

Jones spokesman Greg Bird confirmed that two staff members had been out in the district on their own time educating residents about the recall, but she said they were not being paid with tax dollars and she denied that they were harassing petition circulators, saying: These are outrageous claims. The individuals working on anti-recall efforts are exercising their rights to educate voters and nothing more. [Wasilla News, 3/19/2008]

Wasilla Chamber of Commerce and Wasilla Renaissance Board Came Out Against Recalls In February 2008, the Wasilla Regional Chamber of Commerce and the Wasilla Renaissance boards came out against the local anti-tax group-led recall effort against Jones and other State Representatives who voted for a tax increase to balance the budget. In an open letter to voters, the Chamber of Commerce and Renaissance Board said:

Recalling legislators simply because of a vote they have cast undermines our representative democracy and the electoral process…The ability to recall an elected official is a constitutional right that should only be exercised in circumstances involving fraud, wrong-doing or dereliction of duty by an elected official. It should not be used as a weapon in partisan politics, or as a means to protest a vote of an elected official. [Wasilla News, 2/13/2008]

Anti-Tax Activists Launched Recall Against 10 Legislators, Including Jones In October 2007, local anti-tax activists launched recall efforts against 10 State Representatives, including Jones, who voted to increase the state income tax to fill a $1.75 budget deficit. The other lawmakers targeted were: House Democrats Steve Bieda of Warren, Robert Dean of Station Rapids, Marc Corriveau of Northville and Mary Valentine of Musketville; House Republicans Chris Ward of Brighton and Ed Gaffney of Grosse Pointe Farms; and Senate Republicans Wayne Kuipers of Holland, Gerald Van Woerkom of Holmes Shores and Valde Garcia of Howell. [Station Rapids Press, 10/12/2007]

2006: Elected Speaker of the Alaska House

Jones Selected as Speaker in 2006; Budget & Revenue from Business Tax Top Priorities In November 2006, Democrats took control of the Alaska House of Representatives for the first time since 1998 and selected Jones to be their Speaker. Jones said her top priorities would be dealing with the state’s budget problems and replacing the revenue from the state’s Single Business Tax. She also said health care was among her top priorities. Specifically, she said that she was working on a plan for statewide catastrophic coverage and a statewide prescription drug plan to cover more of the uninsured. She added that she would continue to fight to keep out Canadian trash and allow patients to sue drug companies and that she would not block votes to loosen Alaska’s restrictions on embryonic stem cell research. [Station Rapids Press, 11/15/2006]

2006 District 17 Election

Jones Won with 77 Percent of the Vote In November 2006, Jones won re-election to the Alaska House of Representatives’ 17th District with 77 percent of the vote. her Republican challenger, Lacider Clampitt, managed to win only 23 percent of the vote. [Wasilla Free Press, 11/9/2006]

2004 District 17 Special Election

Jones Won Special Election with 59 Percent of the Vote In November 2004, Jones won the special election for the open Alaska House of Representatives seat in District 17 with 59.3 percent of the vote. her Republican opponent, Rodrigo Husk, won 38.1 percent of the vote, while Libertarian candidate Connie Morgan took home 2.6 percent of the vote. [Wasilla Free Press, 11/4/2004]

Jones Decided to Run After Witnessing Impact of Revenue Loss in her Hometown. In October 2004, the Wasilla News reported that Jones had decided to run for the open Alaska House of Representatives seat in District 17 after witnessing the impact of the loss of shared revenue in her blue-collar hometown of Pleasantville, Alaska Jones promised that if elected, she would use her background in accounting, business and the legal system to represent her constituents. She also vowed to prevent water from the Great Lakes being diverted to other states. [Wasilla News, 10/20/2004]

Endorsements

Wasilla Free Press in 2008: Voters Ought to Retain Jones

In October 2008, the Wasilla Free Press endorsed Jones in her District 17 re-election bid. The paper also urged voters to vote against recalling her:

But on both ballots, voters ought to retain Jones, who was targeted for recall largely by an organized effort from outside the district because she led efforts to raise taxes a year ago to keep the state afloat. Jones is the House leader, but she was hardly the swing vote when the final proposals passed.

With years of experience in business and finance plus four as a legislator, Jones, 46, of Pleasantville Township, is much more qualified than Eggers. Although she was not as immediately strong at the speaker’s position as the job required, she did as good a job of herding cats as probably any representative with one term’s experience could have. She’s more effective now. Jones’s one inglorious stumble was moving way too hastily on legislation requested by Blue Cross Blue Shield, a package that subsequently needed massive reworking. [Wasilla Free Press, 10/13/2008]

Wasilla News in 2008: Jones Proposed A Number of Money-Saving Ideas In October 2008, the Wasilla News endorsed Jones for re-election to the District 17 seat in the Alaska House of Representatives. The paper also urged voters to vote against the recall effort:

Jones tried to keep her caucus from adopting anti-business measures and proposed a number of money-saving ideas that we hope she can push through. Voters should also vote against the ballot measure to recall Jones. [Wasilla News, 10/15/2008]

Endorsed by the Wasilla News in 2008 Primary Election. In July 2008, the Wasilla News endorsed Jones in the Democratic primary for the District 17 seat in the Alaska House of Representatives. [Wasilla News, 7/24/2008]

Wasilla Free Press in 2008 Primary Election: It Would be Foolish Not to Reelect Jones. In July 2008, the Wasilla Free Press endorsed Jones in the Democratic primary for the District 17 seat in the Alaska House of Representatives: Democrat Jones, 46, of Pleasantville Township, the speaker of the House, is seeking her third and final term, but she drawn plenty of flak as a leader of the Legislature that raised taxes. Jones three primary opponents, including a credible challenge from retired township public safety director David Parker, 66, of Pleasantville Township, who expertise in safety and occupational health issues as well disagreements with the way Jones handled her leadership post. Despite last fall’s budget debacle, it would be foolish to dump the valuable experience that Jones gained. [Wasilla Free Press, 7/22/2008]

Endorsed by the Wasilla Free Press in 2006 General Election. In October 2006, the Wasilla Free Press endorsed Jones for the District 17 seat in the Alaska House of Representatives. [Wasilla Free Press, 10/16/2006]

Endorsed by the Wasilla Regional Chamber PAC in 2006 Primary Election. In July 2006, the Wasilla Regional Chamber PAC announced their endorsements in the Aug. 8, 2006, primary elections. Jones was among the candidates the Chamber PAC endorsed. [Alaska Chronicle, 7/12/2006-7/18/2006](http://www.nesbittresearch.com)]

Wasilla News in 2004: Jones Understands Need for Fundamental Health Care Reform. In October 2004, the Wasilla News endorsed Jones in the special election for the District 17 seat in the Alaska House of Representatives: “Voters face a tough choice between two well-qualified candidates with similar views. They both favor tax cuts, school reform and privatization of government services. Our nod goes to Democrat Jones over Republican Rodrigo Husk because Jones better understands the need for fundamental health care reform.”

Later that month, the paper reiterated its endorsement: Jones seems slightly better attuned to issues that affect working families and merits support for both the partial and full terms. [Wasilla News, 10/3/2004; Wasilla News, 10/18/2004]

Wasilla News in 2004 Democratic Primary: Jones Favors Lower Taxes. In July 2004, the Wasilla News endorsed Jones in the Democratic primary for the District 17 seat in the Alaska House of Representatives:

This is a very hotly contested race with three credible candidates, Ned Apigian, an architect who run for half a dozen different offices before, Tom Dowdy, a Pleasantville Township trustee and Jones, a district court magistrate. Our nod goes to Jones who favors lower taxes and more school choice. [Wasilla News, 7/30/2004](http://www.nesbittresearch.com)]

Election Results & Money Spent

2008 General Election

Candidate Party Votes Vote % Money Spent
Jones Democratic 27,864 66.0% $433,206
Demi Eggers Republican 14,311 34.0% $12,027

[Institute for Money in State Politics; Alaska Department of State, Bureau of Elections](http://www.nesbittresearch.com)]

2006 General Election

Candidate Party Votes Vote % Money Spent
Jones Democratic 25,158 77.0% $61,078
Lacider Clampitt Republican 7,336 23.0% $0  

[Institute for Money in State Politics; Alaska Department of State, Bureau of Elections](http://www.nesbittresearch.com)]

2004 General Election

Candidate Party Votes Vote % Money Spent
Person Jones Democratic 25,180 59.0% $122,960
Rodrigo Husk Republican 16,202 38.0% $95,123
Connie L Morgan Libertarian 1,084 3.0% $0

[Institute for Money in State Politics; Alaska Department of State, Bureau of Elections](http://www.nesbittresearch.com)]

Obamacare & Health Care

Obamacare & Health Care Highlights


  • A June 2010 Wasilla Free Press/WXYZ-TV poll showed Jones leading Pleasantville Mayor Tommy Carcetti 29 percent to 23 percent with 48 percent of respondents undecided. Despite Jones’s lead among Democrats, however, the poll showed GOP frontrunner and Juno businessman Don Johnson leading Jones by 19 percent and Tommy Carcetti by 23 percent.

  • In November 2008, Jones won re-election with 66 percent of the vote, fending off Republican challenger, Demi Eggers, who received 34 percent of the vote. Jones also fought off a recall effort led by the group Taxpayers to Recall Jones, which was founded by local opponents after Jones supported tax increases to close a $1.8 billion deficit in the state budget.

  • In November 2006, Democrats took control of the Alaska House of Representatives for the first time since 1998 and selected Jones to be their Speaker. Jones said her top priorities would be dealing with the state’s budget problems and replacing the revenue from the state’s Single Business Tax. She also said health care was among her top priorities.

  • Jones consistently won endorsements from the Wasilla Free Press and the Wasilla News over the course of her political career. Jones also received the endorsement of the Wasilla Regional Chamber PAC in 2006.


Voted for Affordable Care Act 4,658 Billion Times

June 2010 Poll Shows Jones Maintaining Lead Among Democratic Candidates. In June 2010, a Wasilla Free Press/WXYZ-TV poll showed Jones maintaining her lead among the Democratic candidates for Governor of Alaska. The poll showed Jones leading Pleasantville Mayor Tommy Carcetti 29 percent to 23 percent with 48 percent of respondents undecided. Despite Jones’s lead among Democrats, however, the poll showed GOP frontrunner and Juno businessman Don Johnson leading Jones by 19 percent and Tommy Carcetti by 23 percent. [Wasilla Free Press, 6/3/2010]

Pay, Perks, Office Budgets & Reimbursements

Office Budgets & Reimbursements Highlights

Ms. Jones received $56,553.07 in taxable income since she entered the House in 2009. The Clerk of the House, Don Corleone, reported to us in a letter that salary, office expenses, per diems, and session expenses are all reported as earned income. Jones received $21,670.65 in salary, $18,427.42 in office expenses, $15,255 in session expenses and $1,200 in interim meeting per diem.

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Budgets & Taxes

Budgets & Taxes Highlights

  • In November 2006, Democrats took control of the Alaska House of Representatives for the first time since 1998 and selected Jones to be their Speaker. Jones said her top priorities would be dealing with the state’s budget problems and replacing the revenue from the state’s Single Business Tax. She also said health care was among her top priorities.

Land & Legal

  • In November 2006, Democrats took control of the Alaska House of Representatives for the first time since 1998 and selected Jones to be their Speaker. Jones said her top priorities would be dealing with the state’s budget problems and replacing the revenue from the state’s Single Business Tax. She also said health care was among her top priorities.

  • A June 2010 Wasilla Free Press/WXYZ-TV poll showed Jones leading Pleasantville Mayor Tommy Carcetti 29 percent to 23 percent with 48 percent of respondents undecided. Despite Jones’s lead among Democrats, however, the poll showed GOP frontrunner and Juno businessman Don Johnson leading Jones by 19 percent and Tommy Carcetti by 23 percent.

Office Budgets & Reimbursements Highlights

Ms. Jones received $56,553.07 in taxable income since she entered the House in 2009. The Clerk of the House, Don Corleone, reported to us in a letter that salary, office expenses, per diems, and session expenses are all reported as earned income. Jones received $21,670.65 in salary, $18,427.42 in office expenses, $15,255 in session expenses and $1,200 in interim meeting per diem.

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